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1
Mize Hensley

Policeman Hensley was shot and fatally wounded when he and the police chief ordered the driver of a truck to stop blowing his horn in the downtown business district. The suspect opened fire, striking Policeman Hensley in the spine and the chief in the hand. The chief returned fire killing the suspect.

Policeman Hensley's wound was so serious that he was transported to a hospital in Lexington, where he remained until succumbing to the wound four days later.

Policeman Hensley had served with the agency for several years. He was survived by his wife and sister.

Bio

Age 52
Tour Not available
Badge Not available

Incident Details

Cause Gunfire
Incident Date Tuesday, August 4, 1936
Weapon Gun; Unknown type
Offender Shot and killed

http://www.odmp.org/officer/6406-policeman-mize-hensley 
HENSLEY, Mize (I539034105)
 
2 "Creek Holds Bodies of 2 Scouts and Scoutmaster - Fred M Coe Of Union City Area Fails To Save Youths And Perishes - Efforts to find the bodies of the heroic scoutmaster and two scouts who were dragged to their deaths in the treacherous waters of a French Creek whirlpool still proved futile last night. State Police said searchers had not yet found the bodies of Scoutmaster Fred M Coe, 28, of Union CIty, RD 4; and scouts Robert Sadoski, 14, and Harvey Brady, 17, both of Millcreek Township, Erie County. All perished when their canoes capsized Saturday morning while on an explorer expedition. The two-day search for the victims had to be called off again last night because of darkness. Two other Boy Scout leaders and five other youths escaped death in the triple tragedy which occurred a quarter mile east of Pollock Bridge between Mill Village and Waterford. The survivors who were treated at Stem Memorial Hospital in Union City for shock and exposure were: Clyde Watson, 30, Harborcreek, RD 7, field executive of the Washington Trail Boy Scouts; Walter Shenk, 23, of North East, a scout executive; Alan VanderWelle, 16, of North East; Albert R Fuller, 15, of 22 E High St, Union City; Peter Hatch, 14, of 29 W High St, Union City; Noel Magee, 14, of 120 S Main St, Union City; Richard Bisbee, 14, of 24 Hazen St, Union City. Mr Watson, who along with Mr Coe had gone back into the turbulent waters to attempt to rescue the scouts, was suffering from severe shock and was reportedly near nervous collapse. According to the survivors, the group launched their canoes into the rain-swollen creek about 9 am. Two persons to a canoe, they had gone only about 1,400 feet when the lead craft struck a submerged branch and upset, spilling its occupants into the swift current. The sight threw the rest of the boys into panic, according to eyewitnesses, and two more of the light canoes were overturned by the whirlpool. In spite of all being qualified swimmers, the boys frantically fought to grab branches of trees or swim to shore. One by one the other three canoes capsized. The two drowned boys were in one of the lead canoes. After the canoe carrying Mr Coe and Scout Ross [Fuller] capsized, they both grabbed the branches. Mr Coe then said 'I'm all right, I'll swim for it,' according to the scout. Fuller hung onto the canoe after it went over but had trouble keeping his grip. Several times he was forced underwater and was finally saved when a motorist from the nearby highway helped him from the water. Mr Coe plunged back into the icy waters in a vain attempt to save the two boys. After he went in the second time, Mr Watson said, he failed to come back. The surviving official dove into the creek several times in an attempt to save the same youth Mr Coe was trying to reach. The section of the creek is considered the most treacherous in the entire length of the waterway. The depth of the channel where the accident occurred is between 12 and 35 feet. Ralph Manross, a farmer at whose place the scouts had camped on Friday night, called the Stancliff Hose Co of Waterford after the tragedy for aid. Mr Watson and Scout Fuller had hailed a passing car to get to the Manross home. In a matter of minutes, volunteer firemen were searching all along French Creek for the survivors. They were joined shortly by State Police. Within 10 minutes, Fire Chief Rex Scott said, there were more than 100 volunteers looking for the bodies. Volunteers from Cambridge Springs, Meadville, Edinboro and Mill Village joined the others in the grim search. Four of the five canoes were found within an hour. The survivors were taken to Manor Tavern where a first aid station was set up. Mr Watson returned to the creek and remained there for more than an hour, praying and waiting for the others to be found. In spite of trying to remain calm, he broke into hysterical sobs as he awaited the news of all his charges. According to E T Spangler, executive officer of the Scout Council, the creek was calm when the canoes were launched. His statement said Mr Coe, who was scoutmaster of Troop 3 in Union City, and Mr Watson decided that the creek was rising and had ordered the canoes to shore just before the first craft capsized. The drowned scoutmaster, he said, was a veteran leader of a number of canoe trips. He was a nephew of L F Thayer, telegraph and sports editor of The Titusville Herald. Several youths did not make the trip. One of them, Dennis Kennedy, 14, son of Mr and Mrs George Kennedy of Union City, RD 2, came down with the measles last Wednesday and could not make the trip. He was scheduled to ride in the same canoe with Mr Coe." (Titusville Herald, May 14, 1956, pp.2, 8) SADOSKI, Robert J. (I877)
 
3 (live-in neice) GLEASON, Virginia Irene (I0731)
 
4 1st Marriage of Alfred N Russell. Married Wolfe Counbty SMITH, Yvonne (I118911305)
 
5 1st Marriage of William M Robinson....13 march,1833,Clay County, Kentucky SHELTON, Catherine (I535423367)
 
6 1st Marriage: 13 March, 1833, Clay County, Kentucky SHELTON, Catherine (I535423302)
 
7 79, formerly of Elyria, Ohio, son of the late Walter and Alexandria Budzinski Kosinski.

Mr. Kosinski was a U.S. Army sergeant and veteran of World War II; and a former employee of Jewell Tea Co.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Sally Ann Kolodziejczak Kosinski; and two brothers, Wallace and Walter Kosinski.

He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Stanley (Harriet) Sadoski and Mrs. Bernard (Mary) Bagniszewski, both of Erie; a brother, Joseph Kosinski of Erie; a goddaughter, Judith M. Ostromecki of Erie; and many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews.

Burial at Calvary Cemetery.  
KOSINSKI, Frank Stanley (I1651)
 
8 91, son of the late Albert and Frances Mazarowski Mozdyniewicz.

He worked as a welder for Sims Co., retiring in 1976 after more than 20 years. He formerly worked as a bartender at Mozdy's Café. He attended East High School and competed in swimming. He was a member of St. Stanislaus Catholic Church. He enjoyed fishing, swimming across Presque Isle Bay and shooting at rifle ranges.

He was preceded in death by his wife of 63 years, Genevieve "Jean" Lubomski Mozdy, on April 12; five sisters, Mary Sadoski, Mary Alice Mozdyniewicz, Katherine Kubiak, Victoria Palcho and Tekla Gorney; five brothers, Charles, Frank, Edward, Louis and Leo Mozdy; and an infant brother.

Burial will be at Wintergreen Gorge Cemetery. 
MOZDYNICWICZ, Stanley (I2060)
 
9 Battles:
Fought on 7 Apr 1862 at Shiloh, TN.
Fought on 15 Sep 1862 at Green River, KY.
Fought on 8 Oct 1862 at Perryville, KY.
Fought on 8 Oct 1862 at Lawrenceburg, KY.
Fought on 9 Oct 1862 at Perryville, KY.
Fought on 9 Oct 1862 at Kentucky.
Fought on 31 Dec 1862 at Stones River, TN.
Fought on 12 Jan 1863 at Harpeth Shoals, TN.
Fought on 24 Jun 1863 at Liberty Gap, TN.
Fought on 19 Sep 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.
Fought on 20 Sep 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.
Fought on 21 Sep 1863 at Lookout Mountain, TN.
Fought on 22 Sep 1863 at Chattanooga, TN.
Fought on 25 Sep 1863 at Lookout Mountain, TN.
Fought on 21 Oct 1863 at Brown's Ferry, TN.
Fought on 23 Nov 1863 at Chattanooga, TN.
Fought on 24 Nov 1863 at Orchard Knob, TN.
Fought on 25 Nov 1863 at Missionary Ridge, TN.
Fought on 28 Dec 1863 at Charleston, TN.
Fought on 15 Mar 1864 at Rutledge, TN.
Fought on 9 May 1864 at Rocky Face Ridge, GA.
Fought on 11 May 1864 at Dalton, GA.
Fought on 13 May 1864 at Resaca, GA.
Fought on 14 May 1864 at Resaca, GA.
Fought on 15 May 1864 at Resaca, GA.
Fought on 25 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.
Fought on 27 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.
Fought on 30 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.
Fought on 20 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
Fought on 21 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
Fought on 23 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
Fought on 27 Jun 1864 at Marietta, GA.
Fought on 4 Jul 1864 at Marietta, GA.
Fought on 24 Jul 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
 
RUSSELL, Absalom Crossom (I539034266)
 
10 BRANNAN, May K. 
May (Kai) Brannan, 83, of Hartford, beloved wife of the late Harold F. Brannan, died Tuesday, (March 20, 2001) in Winter Park, FL. She was born and raised Healdsburg, CA, had lived in New York City, NY and has resided in Hartford the past 50 years. Mrs. Brannan was a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, CA with a degree in Nursing. She was an employee of the institute of Living, Hartford, for 25 years and in 1984 retired from the Rocky Hill Veterans Home and Hospital. Mrs. Brannan is survived by her son, Harold F. "Skip" Brannan of Newington and his fiancee, Lou Ann Fantozzi of Meriden; her daughter, Margaret "Dee Dee" Pies-chel and her husband, Al of Lake Mary, FL; a sister, Marie Kai of San Francisco, CA; seven grandchildren, Jason, Kevin and Erica Brannan, Dana Gordon and her husband, David, Melody Parry and her husband, Gareth, Heather and Camille Sorvas and a great granddaughter, Courtney Gordon. A Memorial Service will be Saturday, March 24, 12 Noon at the Shee-han-Hilborn-Breen Funeral Home, 1 084 New Britain Ave., West Hartford. Visitation will begin at 11:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations in memory of May can be made to the American Diabetes Association, 300 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450.
 
KAI, May (I539036286)
 
11 Chickamagua after battle report:
Report of Col. William W. Berry, Fifth Kentucky Infantry.
HDQRS. FIFTH KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS,
Chattanooga, September 27, 1863.


CAPT.: I have the honor to submit the following report of movements of my
command in the action of the 19th instant:
Early on the morning of the 19th we marched with the brigade from the
extreme right to the left of the army, and were then thrown forward to
retake ground rom which a portion of the army had been driven before we
arrived. The brigade was formed in two lines, my regiment being on the left
of the front line and the extreme left of the army. Skirmishers were thrown
out and the command moved forward. The skirmish line was soon engaged.
The brigade took the double-quick, charged the enemy, and drove him a
mile., retaking fully the ground lost in the morning. Her we were halted in
the edge of a field, my command forming, with the First Ohio, and obtuse
angle, with the opening toward the front. The enemy were soon seen
working round toward our left. Notified Col. Baldwin of this, when he
ordered the Ninety-third Ohio to deploy on my left. It had scarcely gotten
into position before the attack opened on us, with infantry and artillery. Col.
Strong, of the Ninety-third, was wounded at almost the first fire and his
regiment slightly recoiled, thus leaving my flank exposed; but the left
companies poured in an oblique fire, and in a moment the Ninety-third came
dashing forward under Col. Baldwin, kept it up, charged and drove the
enemy in their front, and captured two guns. The enemy had already been
repulsed in my front, and this was
the last we heard of them for an hour and a half, when they again advanced,
attacked, and were driven back in more confusion than before. Capt. Hurley
and Lieut. Ayars had command of the skirmish line up to this time, and
merit the highest commendation for their skill and courage. The enemy
repulsed, I ordered the command to cease firing, and for a few moments the
utmost quiet reigned, when just at disk an officer called my attention to the
right, where the First Ohio had been, and there stood a rebel line of battle
pouring its fire into the second line of the brigade. A slight ridge had cut the
line of vision between me and the First Ohio, which regiment I could not see
without going on the top of this ridge. It seems that the troops on their right
had given way, thus letting the enemy in on their flank, and they had fallen
back to the second line. I had no notice of this till I saw the direction of the.
It was so dark, that except by this direction of the fire, you could not tell
friend from foe. I was completely cut off. I ordered the regiment to move
off silently. The enemy thought us a part of their line and did not fire into
us, but a Federal brigade (Starkweather's, I believe) coming up just then,
poured a volley in my ranks and killed many of my men. We not stopping
they ran away, fortunately for us. Upon reaching the second line I faced the
regiment about and opened instantly on the enemy, who, thinking their own
line was firing on them, soon retreated, leaving us in full possession of the
ground. In this half-hour's work I lost 100 men and 7 officers killed and
wounded. Maj. Thomasson, Capt. Lovett, and Capt. Lucas have been since
missing; but it is to be hoped that they are only wounded and prisoners, as
there are no better officers in this army. Here the brigade staff rode up, and
informing me that Col. Baldwin could not be found, reported to me for
orders, and I took command of the brigade. For a further report of the part
taken by the brave men of the Fifth Kentucky, I respectfully refer you to the
report of Capt. Huston, simply adding that harder fighting was never done
and truer officers and men were never known.
Respectfully, your obedient servant.

WM. W. BERRY,
Col. Fifth Kentucky Volunteers.
Capt. FRANK P. STRADER,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brigade.

----------- 
RUSSELL, Absalom Crossom (I539034266)
 
12 Jay Cooke Hensley Short Bio 
Posted 07 Dec 2013 by Tammy Hensley Smith 
 Jay Cooke Hensley (son of John Hensley and Mary Ellen Combs)118 was born 1879, and died 1932. He married Sarah Vires on Abt. July 1897, daughter of Mary Fletcher.

Notes for Jay Cooke Hensley:
Per Barbara Deaton Jay was a rather tall, lean, handsome man with black hair and olive complexion.

Sarah and Jay lived in the Shoulderblade section of Breathitt County on Old House Branch. Their 11 children were born there. The house was a two-room wooden structure. A dog-trot separated the rooms. They slept and lived in the two rooms. They ate in a separate, smokehouse-type structure. The cooking was done in this building, or outside.

Sometime during the 1920's Jay moved his family to Jackson. They moved, in a wagon, to a house on the right side of the road about half-way up Town Hill. Jay and Sarah never owned property.

At the age of 52, Jay C. died as the result of a gunshot would. It seems his son Charlie, Walker Hollon, and others were drinking and playing cards up in the hill near the home. Jay went up there to persuade Charlie to come to the house. Charlie had a gun. A scuffle ensued, the gun discharged, and Jay was struck in the thigh/groin. He bled to death before they could get him into town for medical attention.

Mize Hensley (born 1884) was a city policeman when this happened. He was involved in the investigation that followed. He was most aggressive in pushing for justice. He wanted a quick trial and severe punishment.

Charlie and Walker Hollon were indicted for murder. Reportedly some money exchanged hands. Sarah was now a widow with no cash, no property, and no money in the bank. She had no means with which to help her son. Therefore, when the case came to trial Charlie was tried alone. He was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to 21 years in prison. He served 6-7 years in the State Prison at Frankfort.

More About Jay Cooke Hensley and Sarah Vires:
Marriage: Abt. July 1897
 
HENSLEY, Jay Cooke (I539034096)
 
13 Regiment History: Fifth Infantry
KENTUCKY
(3-YEARS)

Fifth Infantry. -- Cols., Lovell H. Rousseau, Harvey M.
Buckley, William W. Berry; Lieut.-Col., John L. Treanor; Maj.,
Charles L. Thomasson.

On July 1, 1861, six companies of men, organized in Louisville as the "Louisville Legion," crossed the river and went into camp on the Indiana side, the camp being named Camp Jo Holt. It was under the leadership of Lovell H. Rousseau that this movement was made and he became the colonel of the regiment formed of these and other companies. On Sept. 9 the regiment was mustered into the U. S. service, on the 17th Rousseau led his men from Camp Holt, and proceeded under the command of Col. W. T. Sherman to Muldraugh's Hill. The regiment remained for some time on duty along the railroad to Bowling Green and Nashville. It arrived at Pittsburg landing in time to take part in the second day's battle at that place.
From Shiloh the regiment went to Corinth and thence with
Buell's army to Huntsville, Ala. In the summer of 1862 it
marched to Kentucky with Buell and on the way from Louisville to Perryville was engaged with the enemy at a place called Dog Walk near Lawrenceburg. After the battle at Perryville, in which although present it
was not engaged, it went in pursuit of Bragg as far as Crab Orchard thence to Bowling Green and Nashville, and camped on the road to Franklin. In the battle of Murfreesboro the regiment bore its part and lost a number of men in killed and wounded. The regiment also took part in all the movements about Chattanooga, and was in the battle of Chickamauga under Gen. Thomas, whose troops stood so bravely against superior numbers. The regiment was engaged at Orchard knob, where, among other casualties, Col. Berry was wounded, but refused to
retire. In the great engagement at Missionary Ridge, Col. Berry was again wounded and rendered unable to walk. In that battle the regiment lost 47 killed and wounded. It engaged in the operations against Longstreet in East Tennessee during the winter being about Knoxville, New Market, Strawberry plains, and Lenoir's station. While in East Tennessee a portion of the regiment went into
the veteran organization and were transferred to the 2nd Ky. veteran cavalry. The 5th participated in much of the fighting in the Atlanta campaign, first at Rocky Face Ridge. At Resaca, it lost a number in killed and wounded, among the killed being Capt. Ed. Miller of Co. G. Loss was also sustained at Pumpkin Vine creek, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain, Chattahoochee River,
Peachtree creek and other battles around Atlanta.
From Atlanta it returned to Nashville in Aug., 1864. The time of the regiment expired in September and it was mustered out at Louisville Sept. 14, 1864. A portion of the regiment entered the veteran organization -- between 80 and 100 men. These proceeded under charge of Capt. John Baker from Louisville to Nashville and reported to Gen. Thomas for duty. They participated in the battle of Nashville and after that went on the pursuit of Hood's army as far as Athens, Ala. From Athens they returned to Nashville, were then taken by way of Louisville, Pittsburg and Philadelphia to New York, thence
by ocean transport to Hilton Head, S. C., and from there
proceeded to Raleigh, N. C., where they joined Sherman's
forces. After the surrender they returned to Louisville, where they were mustered out July 25, 1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 320
 
RUSSELL, Absalom Crossom (I539034266)
 
14 Report of Capt. John M. Huston, Fifth Kentucky Infantry.
HDQRS. FIFTH KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS.
September 27, 1863,

SIR: I make, by order, the following report of the operations of the Fifth
Regt. Kentucky Volunteers in the battle of the 20th instant:
Upon colonel Baldwin's disappearance, Col. Berry assumed command of the
brigade, and I took command of the regiment, Lieut.-Col. Treanor being
on detached duty, and Maj. Thomasson shot. The regiment at this time was
standing in line of battle, having just repulsed the enemy in a night fight.
Presently I was ordered to move my command to the rear to get connection
with the general line of the army. Reaching this point, the brigade was
formed in two lines, the Fifth Kentucky was on the right of the second line.
At 9 o'clock on the morning of the 20th the enemy attacked, but was
repulsed all along the line. At 10 o'clock, as I was moving my command
forward to strengthen the front line, the left of the division on our left was
seen to give way. Col. Berry halted me, and ordered a change of front
forward on the left company, which was promptly executed, thus throwing
my line perpendicular to the front. The troops on the immediate left of the
brigade stood fast, but those on the extreme left fled in the utmost confusion,
the enemy pursuing till he was in our original rear. Another change of front
was ordered and executed, and being commanded to charge the enemy in
his flank, I did so, fell upon him, and drove him a mile and a half. I suppose
in this charge we captured 200 prisoners, among them Brig.-Gen. Adams,
besides inflicting heavy loss upon the enemy in killed and wounded. Here
Capt. Moninger was wounded, and my oldest son, Lieut. Huston, was
killed. He died like a soldier, with sword in hand, in the midst of a
victorious charge upon a fleeing enemy. I was ordered back to the brigade,
and joined it immediately, where I lay in the second line till evening, when
I was ordered to fall back with the brigade to Rossville, which we did in the
utmost order regularity.
The officers and men conducted themselves in a manner to reflect great
credit upon themselves and their country, the only difficulty being to restrain
them from going too far. Lieut. Zoller, though wounded, kept his place
with his company and behaved most manfully. Capt.'s Hurley, Lindenfelser,
and Wilson, and Lieut.'s McCorkhill, Miller, Powell, Thomas, and Jones
are gallant soldiers. The conduct of Adjutant Johnstone was conspicuous for
courage, and I thank him for the assistance given myself. I am under great
obligations to Dr. Barr, of the First Ohio, detailed to take charge of my
wounded, which duty was discharged fearlessly and energetically. The men
of the Fifth Kentucky are soldiers; this is not only proven by their bravery
on the field, but by the patience and forbearance with which they endured
the most extraordinary labor, exposure and privation. John T. Steele, of
company B, especially deserves mention. Struck four times, he still stuck to
his gun, and was with the Ninety-third Ohio when the cannon was captured,
he himself reaching the pieces first and capturing the battery battle flag.
Corpl. William Murphy, of Company I, when the color-bearer was shot,
seized the flag and thenceforth bore it.

Respectfully, your obedient servant.
JOHN M. HUSTON,
Capt.
Capt. FRANK P. STRADER,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brigade.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLII.] THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN. PAGE 568-50
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 50.]
Find Soldiers in this Regiment: U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles
 
RUSSELL, Absalom Crossom (I539034266)
 
15 Stone's River after battle report:
Reports of Lieut. Col. William W. Berry, Fifth Kentucky Infantry.
HDQRS. LOUISVILLE LEGION, FIFTH REGIMENT
KENTUCKY VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, In Camp, January 8, 1863.


SIR: Having been called upon to furnish a report of the operations of
my command from December 26, 1862, to January 4, 1863, inclusive,
I have the honor to submit the following:
On the morning of December 26, 1862, being on picket duty with my
regiment, I received orders to join the column marching southward on
the Nolensville road. We reached Nolensville at 3 o'clock the next
morning.
At daylight of the 27th I was ordered forward, and marching 3 miles we
found the enemy, with some artillery, prepared to obstruct our march.
We were thrown out on the right of the road, and immediately pushed
at them, but they fell back to a new position; and this was repeated time
and again throughout the day, until we reached a point 1 mile south of
Triune. We traversed in line of battle this day some 4 or 5 miles of
country, made up of corn and cotton fields, thickets, swamps, and
woods. I sustained no loss in this skirmish.
Sunday morning, December 28, I was ordered to support Gen.
Willich in a reconnaissance. No enemy was found, and we returned to camp.
On Monday, Gen. McCook's command having moved off toward
Murfreesborough, distant some 15 miles, we were left near Triune to
prevent the enemy interrupting the march of the main column.
Here we remained till the morning of the 30th, when we marched off
toward Murfreesborough and rejoined the division, which we found
moving into position beyond Wilkinson's Cross-Roads.
In a short time orders came for us to support a cavalry reconnaissance
of the country lying to the right of our front. No enemy was found in
this direction, and we returned to the division. We were then placed in
position as a reserve for the other two brigades of Gen. Johnson's
command, occupying the extreme right of the army.
Early the next morning I received orders to form a line of battle 150
paces in rear of the First Regt. Ohio Volunteers; this done, the
command "forward" was given. In this advance, Capt. A. H. Speed, of
Company C, was struck in the abdomen by a spent ball and severely
injured; but, like a true soldier, he retained the command of his
company until late in the evening, when he was ordered to the hospital.
When the First Ohio reached a fence on the crest of a hill, it became
hotly engaged. At the same time there was rapid firing from the Sixth
Indiana, on the left, and also from some regiment on the right of the
First Ohio. A section of Simonson's battery had been moved to the
front, to the left and abreast of the First Ohio. A battery of the enemy
immediately opened upon it, and their shells killed and wounded many
of my men. Presently I observed the regiment to the right of the First
Ohio in full retreat, and in a few minutes I saw the First Ohio moving
to the rear.
I could see no enemy, on account of the intervening ridge, and
supposing that the First Ohio had exhausted their ammunition, I instantly
prepared to take its place; but just before it reached my lines, to my
utter amazement, a mass of the enemy appeared, moving obliquely upon
my right flank. A change of front was imperative. While executing this
movement, refusing my right to the enemy, the First Ohio passed
through the right of my regiment and threw into great confusion my four
right companies. Their officers promptly arrested this, and I here take
occasion to thank Capt. John Lucas, commanding Company F, First
Lieut.'s Thomas Foreman, commanding Company A, and Joseph E.
Miller, commanding Company D, and Second Lieut. A. Sidney Smith,
commanding Company I, for their steadiness at this trying moment.
In the mean time, my left getting into position, poured its fire into the
steadily advancing columns of the enemy; but the troops to my left were
giving way, and the enemy, getting a battery into position, almost
enfiladed me. The right of the division was completely crushed in, and
I had no connection, consequently no protection, here. It was soon
manifest that I must fall back or be isolated.
A new position was taken some 200 paces in rear of our first, and here
I believe we could have successfully resisted the enemy, but some
general, I do not know who, ordered the entire line to fall back still
farther, and those who like rapid movements would have been more than
satisfied with the celerity with which some of the floating fragments of
regiments obeyed him.
Pending this movement my attention was called by Col. Baldwin to
a piece of artillery abandoned by those whose business it was to look
after it. A full battery of the enemy was playing on it at the time. I
immediately yoked the Legion to it, and, with Huston and Thomasson
as the wheel-horses, it was dragged to the railroad, where the new line
was forming. I was shortly ordered to move by the flank farther up the
railroad, where a position was taken that was not assailed on this day.
I had gone into the fight with 320 muskets, a portion of my command
being on detached service; 19 men were killed, including Capt.
Ferguson, of Company I, who was one of our best officers; 80 were wounded.
Among the latter were 7 commissioned officers, viz: Lieut.
Col. W. W. Berry, shot through the wrist; Maj. John L. Treanor,
wounded by a shell in the thigh; Capt. A. H. Speed, wounded in the
abdomen; Capt. L. P. Lovett, slightly, in the thigh; First Lieut. Frank
Dissell, mortally; First Lieut. John D. Sheppard, seriously, through the
left lung, and First Lieut. William H. Powell, slightly, in the shoulder,
and 26 missing. Some of these, I am mortified to say, ran away at the
first fire. Their names shall be duly reported.
During the engagement my color-bearer was shot, and down went the
flag, but like lightning it gleamed aloft again in the hands of three men,
struggling who should have it. Their names are John B. Scheible,
Company E; Charles Fleckhammer, jr., Company H, and Sergt. John
Baker, Company D. The latter bore it throughout the remainder of the
day. Private William Shumaker, of Company G, was badly shot through
the thigh, but persisted in fighting with the regiment till he was forced
to the rear by order of his captain. I commend him for his devotion.
Sergeant-Maj. Willett deported himself most bravely, and deserves
promotion. Adjutant Johnstone rendered me every assistance in his
power, and I especially thank him.
On the morning of January 1, I received orders to move farther to the
front. There was no general advance of our lines, though constant
skirmishing through the day. Capt. Thomasson had command of the
skirmish line, and by his adroitness was mainly instrumental in the
capture of 95 prisoners. The enemy held a dense wood about 300 yards
in front of us, in the edge of which were some cabins occupied by
sharpshooters. I proposed to push forward my skirmishers and dislodge
them, provided those on my right and left were simultaneously
advanced. This, though ordered, was not done, and I did not deem it
safe to expose my flank; but toward evening the fire of these riflemen
became so annoying that I was determined, at any cost, to stop it. I
ordered Capt.'s Hurley and Lindenfelser to move with their companies
directly upon the houses and burn them. Across the open fields they
dashed, the enemy having every advantage in point of shelter. Capt.
Huston was then ordered to their support, and the place was literally
carried by assault, the houses burned, and 5 of the enemy left dead upon
the spot. This was the last we heard of the sharpshooters. The daring
displayed by officers and men in this affair deserves especial
consideration. But one man was hurt-Corporal Moneypenny, shot
through the leg.
The skirmishing in which my command took part on the days succeeding
this was of an uneventful character, and I forego the details.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. W. BERRY,
Lieut.-Col., Cmdg.
Capt. WILLIAM MANGAN,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brigade.


Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXXII.] THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN. PAGE 341-29
[Series I. Vol. 20. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 29.] 
RUSSELL, Absalom Crossom (I539034266)
 
16 A presumption has been made that she was buried in the same cemetery as her husband, who preceded her in death by over 20 years. There is no marker for her at Fuller-Cole Cemetery. Her name does not appear in an online cemetery transcription. However, her obituary is clear that she is buried beside her husband. SPENCER, Esther F. (I2558)
 
17 A.C. Russell, ex-dean of U of L law school, dies at the age of 90 A. C. "Ab" Russell, former dean of the University of Louisville School of Law, died Wednesday at his home after a long illness. He was 90. Russell, dean of the law school from 1946 to 1957, joined the U of L staff in 1938 and retired as distinguished professor of law in 1972. The native of Jackson, Ky., graduated from Berea College in 1928 and from Yale Law School in 1930. After serving with the FBI for five years, he practiced law in Frankfort until joining the U of L faculty. He served as acting dean for three years during World War II. A bronze bust of Russell, by sculptor Barney Bright, was placed in the rotunda of the school in 1972 in recognition of his many years of service. In 1948, Russell revised the Kentucky Civil and Criminal Codes, which governs court procedure of civil and criminal cases. His book, "Russell's Kentucky Practice and Service," which covered the same area of all the rules, provisions and statues that relate to the practice of civil and criminal cases in Kentucky, was published in 1953. He put out a supplement once or twice a year and made a complete revision about every 10 years. In 1955, he and James R. Merritt, who later became dean of the law school, wrote "Wills and Administration of Estates in Kentucky." At one time he also drafted the rules of criminal procedure for Kentucky for the Legislative Research Commission. Russell 1972 PHOTO Russell was a member of the Kentucky and Louisville Bar associations, and the Filson Club. He was a member of the American Arbitration Association and the National Academy of Arbitrators and served on the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Services panel of arbitrators. His survivors include his wife, the former Anna Stamper; two daughters, Mary Russell of Laurel, Md.,. and Anne R. Nicholas; a son, Andrew J. Russell of Crestwood; four grandchildren; and a great-grandchild. There will be a private graveside service in Berea. Visitation is at Pearson's, 149 Breckenridge Lane, from 6 to 9 p.m. today. The family suggests that memorial gifts be made to Berea College Office of Alumni Affairs, Campus P. O. Box 2343, Berea, Ky. 40404. RUSSELL, Absalom Crosem (I535428762)
 
18 Absolom Crossom Russell

We have found quite a few genealogies which include Absolom (circa 1760) originating from Scotland. Some pointing to a village named Crossom. We also have found a Scot tartan (2 versions) and a crest (registered with the Lord Lyons) in the Russell name.

However, looking at the time period that Absolom came to America (before 1791) we find it highly unlikely that he would have gotten off a ship and headed for Alabama. At that point in time Alabama was a vast wilderness and very hostile. The distance from Williamsburg, VA (the most likely port of entry) to what would have been Alabama at that time is approximately 500 miles. On foot or horse back the trip would have taken nearly a month. The native Indian tribes in the area at that time were extremely hostile and typically ambushed and killed settlers.

Absolom's son Absolom was born in Lee County Virginia in 1791. This point is generally agreed upon across many of the genealogies we have read.

The references to a village in Scotland named Crossom are in question as well. We have looked through quite a number of maps dated from 1620 through 1810 and have not found a village, county, parrish, clan or any other evidence to suggest that Crossom was the name of a place. We have found however, a family named Crossom in Scotland close to the time period that Absolom was born. It could be possible that one of Absolom's ancestors married and had children with a female from that family.

We have found considerable evidence in print to suggest that Absolom C Russell Sr. was born in Virginia in 1760. We also have found documents (a land grant) giving this Absolom 100 acres of land in what is now Casey County Kentucky. There is also evidence that at 16 years old this Absolom participated in the American Revolution.

From evidence we have found, research we have completed our conclusion is that Absolom (circa 1760) was in fact born in Halifax Virginia and migrated to Kentucky.  
RUSSELL, Absolom (I118973164)
 
19 Age 27, daughter of Thomas and Barbara Mayher Sadoski.

She was a 1995 graduate of Mercyhurst Preparatory High School and a graduate of Penn State Behrend. She worked at Lynn's Hallmark for eight years. She was a member of Saint Luke Catholic Church. She enjoyed walking, basketball and collectibles.

She was preceded in death by her maternal grandmother, Dorothy I. Seaman Mayher (d. 10/15/2000 age 72).

Survivors include her husband of one year, Nathan Bauschard; her paternal grandparents, Stanley and Harriet Sadoski of Erie; her maternal grandfather, Joseph B. Mayher of New Kensington; her father- and mother-in-law, Gary and Nancie Bauschard; an uncle; an aunt; and several cousins. 
SADOSKI, Lori A (I2089)
 
20 Age 82, daughter of the late Wladislaw and Alexandria Budzinski Kosinski.

A member of St. Stanislaus Parish, she was active in the Mom's Club for many years where she held the office of President. She was also a member of the Holy Rosary Society and the Council of St. Joseph's Apartments.

She was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Bernard B. Bagniszewski in 1999, brothers, Wallace, Joseph, Frank, and Walter Kosinski.

Survivors include: her sister and brother-in-law Stanley and Harriet Sadoski, five daughters; Mrs. Judith Ostromecki, husband Richard, Mrs. Janet Piotrowski, husband James, Mrs. Paulette Patora, husband, Joseph, Bernie Bagniszewski and Denise Ciacchini, all of Erie, four grandchildren, and her wonderful "Club Girls."

Burial in Calvary Cemetery. 
KOSINSKI, Mary Phyllis (I1690)
 
21 Age 85, of Wesleyville, the son of the late Anthony and Mary Jendrasiak Kolodziejczak.

He was a former member of St. James R.C. Church, a member of American Legion Carl Neff Post #571 and the Moniuszko Club. He was employed with General Electric Co. until his retirement in 1981. Prior to that he was a cook with the Merchant Marines with the American Steamship Co., sailing on the Great Lakes. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army serving in WWII under General Patton in the 51st Armour Division, serving in five major battles. He enjoyed playing Santa Claus for his family.

Preceded in death by three sons, Mitchell, Max Jr. and Anthony; two sisters, Sally Kosinski, Irene Garvo and one brother, Carl Kolo.

Max is survived by his wife, Anna Ludwig Kolodziejczak; four daughters, Ann Marie and Theresa Kolodziejczak both of Erie; Patricia Gradler and husband Terry of Harborcreek, Cindy Nail of Indiana, and two sons, Richard P. Kolodziejczak of Harborcreek and Timothy M. Kolodziejczak and wife Mary Lou of Union City; 2 sisters, Mary Burda of Erie and Josephine Jashurek of Sheffield, Pa. and 1 stepson, Robert E. Ludwig of Corry, Pa. and many grandchildren, great grandchildren and nieces and nephews.

Interment North East Cemetery. 
KOLODZIEJCZAK, Max (I2128)
 
22 Alfred Miller Russell suffered from polio his entire life. We found evidence in the World War I draft registration where the examiner termed it as "Muscular Atrophy".

Alfred Miller Russell from about 1900 through 1921 practiced general and criminal law in his own law firm in Jackson, Breathitt, Kentucky.

In 1921 Alfred Miller Russell was elected as the Breathitt county Clerk of Courts. An office he held until his election as the Breathitt County Attorney in 1929. He served as the County Attorney until 1933.

 
RUSSELL, Alfred Miller (I535428689)
 
23 Alfred Overton Russell was 6 feet tall, dark hair, brown eyes and was an extremely handsome gentleman. He attended Eastern College in Richmond Kentucky after service in World War II. For many years he was a federal probation officer with his offices in Jackson Kentucky. His death was the result of lung cancer. He is buried in Jackson Cem., Jackson Kentucky RUSSELL, Alfred Overton (I505524102)
 
24 Alma Jean (Strong) Landrum
March 4, 2015 Alma Jean (Strong) Landrum, 72, Jackson passed away Wednesday, March 4 at the Greg and Noreen Wells Hospice Care Center in Hazard. She was a member of the Whick Community Church. She was the daughter of the late Matthew and Gertrude Strong. She was also preceded in death by daughter, Johnna Ruth Spicer; sister, Wanda Strong. She is survived by her husband, Luther Landrum; four daughters, Becky (Paul) Watkins, Addie (Bill) Landrum, Delilah Jean Landrum, Debra Danielle Landrum; three brothers, O.V. (Linda) Strong, Oscar (Connie) Strong, Larry (Jean) Strong; one sister, Mae (David) Combs; five grandchildren; nine great grandchildren; special friend, Charlotte Bailey; host of relatives, friends and neighbors.

Service:

Sunday, March 8, 2:00 PM

Breathitt Funeral Home Chapel 
STRONG, Alma Jean (I2926)
 
25 Also Sucider from Marriage record SCHNEIDER, Mary (I2226)
 
26 Alvadene Russell, of Dansville, MI, passed away on Friday, February 25, 2022 at her home surrounded by her family. She was born the daughter of William and Maggie (Craft) Montgomery on May 19, 1930. On July 30, 1947 she married Adam Russell, and he preceded her in death in 2002. Alvadene was a member of the Dansville Class of 1949. She enjoyed her gardens and flowers, cooking, reading, and crocheting. She also loved tea parties with her children and grandchildren. Alvadene is survived by her children, Laura Russell, Vaughn Russell, and Bill (Barbara) Russell, along with 11 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. Also surviving are her special friend, Ruhl Bunker Sr., sister-in-law, Betty Spivey, son-in-law, Ralph Mannor, special cousins, Terry and Helen Craft, special niece and nephew, Diana and Jim Hillary. In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by her children, Grover Russell and Victoria Russell, sisters, Sarah Richards, Inez Truskolowski, and her brothers, Duane Montgomery and Johnny O. Montgomery. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, March 2, 2022 from the Caskey-Mitchell Funeral Home at 11:00 a.m. with Pastor Josh Swieringa officiating. Burial will take place at Hillcrest Cemetery in Jackson. The family will receive friends at the funeral home on Tuesday from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. Expressions of sympathy may be made to the Jeruel Baptist Church. MONTGOMERY, Alvadene (I539037616)
 
27 Ancestry: Sherry Butler wrote:
Ellen Baker Deaton was brought to Heidelberg Kentucky after her death. Her "viewing" was at her brother's house in Heidelberg, Alex Deaton (my grandfather), then she was buried near Heidelberg in the Addison Cemetery where he and my grandmother and an aunt are also buried. I had never before seen anyone "layed out" in a home before and haven't since although I know it used to be done in the old days. 
BAKER, Ellen J. (I93499713)
 
28 Ann's marker at masonic Memorial Gardens in Reno has her Date of Birth as 18 Sep 1922. Her birth certificate lists her Date of Birth as 18 Sep 1911. April 11 2023 I found Patricia Prior (daughter of Joan) and messaged her through Ancestry. Transcript of conversations:

06:26 AM
Hi Patricia, We are cousins related through Ann M. (nee - Szesciorka) Auda. I have a few records showing a part of our grand-mother's life if you are interested.
Read, 06:26 AM
PR
Yes, I would be interested. Thanks for getting in touch.
08:40 AM
08:40 AM
APRIL 12
05:24 AM
SZESCIORKA, Ann M. b. 18 Sep 1911 Erie, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA d. 15 Feb 1985 Reno, Washoe, Nevada, USA: Four Branches Genealogy
SZESCIORKA, Ann M. b. 18 Sep 1911 Erie, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA d. 15 Feb 1985 Reno, Washoe, Nevada, USA: Four Branches Genealogy
www.fourbranches.org
Ann M. Szesciorka's past is shrouded in mystery as her past is not well documented. This post contains what we have found so far.
Ann M. Szesciorka's past is shrouded in mystery as her past is not well documented. This post contains what we have found so far.
www.fourbranches.org
Hi Patricia, my wife and I have been researching our families for the past 20 or so years. I keep all of our records in a separate system and use Ancestry, Family Search, My Heritage and a few other sites for research. Here is our Grand-Mother's record in our website: https://www.fourbranches.org/tng/getperson.php?personID=I1639&tree=mhkr Also here is a blog post I wrote some time ago about her. https://www.fourbranches.org/ann-m-szesciorka/ and also you are more than welcome to go through our tree here on Ancestry. We have done DNA tests as well to help gain more insight into our families.
Read, 05:24 AM
PR
Thanks, So you must be the son of Walter? My Mom is Joan. I took a look at the link and it looks accurate except that isn't a picture of Ann. I knew her really well. We spent a summer with her in Reno and I also spent time with her and her husband Vic, and she came to visit us at least once a year., I have quite a few pictures of her. This pic looks more like Ann's mother Stella. I was only five when Stella died but I remember her funeral quite vividly.
08:46 AM
08:46 AM
12:09 PM
You're very welcome! Yes, my Dad's name was Wallace. I can't recall where I got the picture, but I appreciate you possibly identifying who it is. I myself never saw Ann, but it would be nice to see what she actually looked like. If you wouldn't mind sharing pictures I would certainly appreciate it. I was contacted about a year ago by one of Veronica's (Ann's sister) grand daughters. Documentation of the Szesciorka family is very spotty. One of the reasons we decided to spend the money on DNA tests. When we started all I had to go off of was what bit I heard growing up. We really had to dig through several sites to gain what we have. Recently (within the last year) I gained access to a polish genealogical system that has been somewhat helpful for older records. Not speaking polish has made it a slow process, but it's opened up another door within the family.
My Mom would be able to identify the picture as Stella because she knew her well. She told me a funny story about how Stella would call the local television station to complain when they had bowling shows televised, because she thought the bowling balls would break her television. My Mom lived with her for a while I believe. Or she might be able to tell me if it is someone else, but it looks like Stella as I remember her, even though I was very young. My Mom lives about 45 minutes from me so I usually see her every couple weeks or so. I will try to show it to her the next time I see her. I only have Polaroids of Ann ( she actually went by Gail when I knew her). I have to either scan them or get them scanned but I have been meaning to do that, so this will motivate me. I also have some old reel movies that I have not looked at for ages. One of them is of my Mom's wedding. I am almost sure Ann would be in it and possibly Stella. I remember my Dad telling me that Ann was so beautiful at the wedding that people were telling him he was marrying the wrong woman! She was a beautiful woman and always looked at least twenty years younger than her age. I have been wanting to get the wedding digitized so I would have copies to give to relatives. I will get to work and see what I can come up with. I am sure my Mom and siblings have pictures also.
08:51 AM
08:51 AM
You deleted a message
You deleted a message
09:35 AM
KOSINSKI, Wallace Andrew "Junior, Andy" Jr. b. 15 Nov 1929 Erie, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA d. 22 Nov 1989 Erie, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA: Four Branches Genealogy
KOSINSKI, Wallace Andrew "Junior, Andy" Jr. b. 15 Nov 1929 Erie, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA d. 22 Nov 1989 Erie, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA: Four Branches Genealogy
www.fourbranches.org
Kosinski-Russell Families Photo Album
Kosinski-Russell Families Photo Album
www.fourbranches.org
That is so funny about Stella and the bowling balls. So glad your Mom is still with us and doing well. My Dad died in 1989. He was a mess, 1 functioning kidney and it failed. I asked the doctors attending to him if one of my kidneys would work. The doctor told me he wouldn't risk the surgery because he was in such bad shape. I have a few pictures of him if you would like I can send them to you. Here is his record on my site: https://www.fourbranches.org/tng/getperson.php?personID=I1610&tree=mhkr Old photos and movies are well worth digitizing. My wife's aunt had several hundred slides that I digitized for her. Took quite a while to get them all captured. They were fading and a few of them beyond anything anyone could recover. In any case, if you have to pay to get them digitized let me know and I can help with the cost. I have an album on my blog site https://www.fourbranches.org/kosinski-russell-families/ where you can see what I have. The album has both my paternal and maternal sides. I had heard from my Mom and my Uncles that Ann was very beautiful and as you had said that she looked much younger than she was. 
SZESCIORKA, Ann M. (I1639)
 
29 Anne was the daughter of Gov. John Webster (of Connecticut) and his wife, Agnes Smith Webster.

The family first settled in Watertown, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. John then moved his family to Hartford, Connecticut in 1636, as one of the original landowners in Hartford.

Anne married John Marsh about 1642 in Hartford, Connecticut. They had eight children: John, Joseph (died in infancy), Joseph, Samuel, Jonathan, Daniel, Hannah and Grace.

The family attended the First Congregational Church of Hartford. After a religious dispute, in 1659 John took a group of dissenters to Northampton, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. It appears that Anne was with them.

After Anne's death, her husband married Hepzibah Ford Lyman in 1664. 
WEBSTER, Anne (I539037661)
 
30 Anthony Ray Montgomery “Tony”, age 48 passed away in Bromley, KY. on September 23, 2022.

He was preceded in death by a daughter, Grace Montgomery; father, LB Montgomery; sister, April Pennington; and father-in-law, Gene Noble.

He is survived by the love of his life, Dena Montgomery; mother, Shirell Little (Chris) of Jackson, KY; two daughters: Savanna Montgomery and Jenna Montgomery, both of Jackson, KY; one son, Jake Montgomery of Jackson, KY; one sister, Chrissy Roberts (Leonard) of Jackson, KY; mother-in-law, Barbara Russell; step sister, Kimmy (Mike) Zentz of Culver, IN; step brothers: Chuck (Ruth) Diltz and Joe (Nikki) Diltz, both of Culver, IN; nieces: Cori Cheyenne Ramsey and Brianna Roberts; nephews: Brad Roberts, Anthony Roberts, and Sean and Josh Pennington; and special friend, Autumn Jode Hatherill.

Memorial service will be held at a later date.

Deaton Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. 
MONTGOMERY, Anthony Ray (I539036014)
 
31 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I539034141)
 
32 Barbara A. Mayher Sadoski, 64, of Erie, passed away unexpectedly, on Thursday, October 6, 2016, at St. Vincent Health Center. She was born in New Kensington, Pa., on February 11, 1952, a daughter of the late Joseph B. and Dorothy Seamen Mayher.

Barbara was a 1970 graduate of Valley High School in New Kensington and attended Robert Morris University. She worked for a number of years with Tri-State Neurological and was a member of St. Luke Catholic Church. She enjoyed archery, hunting, fishing, gardening, and boating.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her beautiful daughter, Lori A. Sadoski Bauschard in 2003; and her father-in-law and mother-in-law, Stanley and Harriet Sadoski.

Survivors include her beloved husband of 43 years, Thomas M. Sadoski; one brother, Joseph M. Mayher and his wife Angela of New Kensington; one nephew, Joseph Mayher and his fiancé Molly of Longmont, Colo.; one niece, Heather Mayher of New Kensington, Pa.; her sister-in-law, Cindy Hornaman and her husband Chris of Allentown, Pa.; her boys, two Portuguese water dogs, Max and Bailey; many cousins; numerous friends and neighbors; and her co-workers at Tri-State.

Friends may call at the Russell C. Schmidt & Son Funeral Home Inc., 5000 Wattsburg Rd., on Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. and are invited to a prayer service there on Monday at 12:15 p.m. followed by a Funeral Mass at St. Luke Catholic Church at 1:00 p.m. Burial will follow in Wintergreen Gorge Cemetery.

Memorial contributions can be made to the Erie City Mission, 1017 French St., Erie, PA 16512, or to the St. Luke Food Pantry, 421 E. 38th St., Erie, PA 16504.
- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/erietimesnews/obituary.aspx?n=barbara-a-mayher-sadoski&pid=181793901&fhid=8584#sthash.6SfTSegO.dpuf 
MAYHER, Barbra A (I2088)
 
33 Battles
Fought on 7 Apr 1862 at Shiloh, TN.
Fought on 15 Sep 1862 at Green River, KY.
Fought on 8 Oct 1862 at Perryville, KY.
Fought on 8 Oct 1862 at Lawrenceburg, KY.
Fought on 9 Oct 1862 at Perryville, KY.
Fought on 9 Oct 1862 at Kentucky.
Fought on 31 Dec 1862 at Stones River, TN.
Fought on 12 Jan 1863 at Harpeth Shoals, TN.
Fought on 24 Jun 1863 at Liberty Gap, TN.
Fought on 19 Sep 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.
Fought on 20 Sep 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.
Fought on 21 Sep 1863 at Lookout Mountain, TN.
Fought on 22 Sep 1863 at Chattanooga, TN.
Fought on 25 Sep 1863 at Lookout Mountain, TN.
Fought on 21 Oct 1863 at Brown's Ferry, TN.
Fought on 23 Nov 1863 at Chattanooga, TN.
Fought on 24 Nov 1863 at Orchard Knob, TN.
Fought on 25 Nov 1863 at Missionary Ridge, TN.
Fought on 28 Dec 1863 at Charleston, TN.
Fought on 15 Mar 1864 at Rutledge, TN.
Fought on 9 May 1864 at Rocky Face Ridge, GA.
Fought on 11 May 1864 at Dalton, GA.
Fought on 13 May 1864 at Resaca, GA.
Fought on 14 May 1864 at Resaca, GA.
Fought on 15 May 1864 at Resaca, GA.
Fought on 25 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.
Fought on 27 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.
Fought on 30 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.
Fought on 20 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
Fought on 21 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
Fought on 23 Jun 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.
Fought on 27 Jun 1864 at Marietta, GA.
Fought on 4 Jul 1864 at Marietta, GA.
Fought on 24 Jul 1864 at Atlanta, GA.

Regiment History
Fifth Infantry
KENTUCKY
(3-YEARS)
Fifth Infantry. -- Cols., Lovell H. Rousseau, Harvey M.
Buckley, William W. Berry; Lieut.-Col., John L. Treanor; Maj.,
Charles L. Thomasson.
On July 1, 1861, six companies of men, organized in Louisville
as the "Louisville Legion," crossed the river and went into
camp on the Indiana side, the camp being named Camp Jo Holt.
It was under the leadership of Lovell H. Rousseau that this
movement was made and he became the colonel of the regiment
formed of these and other companies.
On Sept. 9 the regiment was mustered into the U. S. service,
on the 17th Rousseau led his men from Camp Holt, and proceeded
under the command of Col. W. T. Sherman to Muldraugh's Hill.
The regiment remained for some time on duty along the railroad
to Bowling Green and Nashville. It arrived at Pittsburg
landing in time to take part in the second day's battle at
that place.
From Shiloh the regiment went to Corinth and thence with
Buell's army to Huntsville, Ala. In the summer of 1862 it
marched to Kentucky with Buell and on the way from Louisville
to Perryville was engaged with the enemy at a place called Dog
Walk near Lawrenceburg.
After the battle at Perryville, in which although present it
was not engaged, it went in pursuit of Bragg as far as Crab
Orchard thence to Bowling Green and Nashville, and camped on
the road to Franklin. In the battle of Murfreesboro the
regiment bore its part and lost a number of men in killed and
wounded.
The regiment also took part in all the movements about
Chattanooga, and was in the battle of Chickamauga under Gen.
Thomas, whose troops stood so bravely against superior
numbers. The regiment was engaged at Orchard knob, where,
among other casualties, Col. Berry was wounded, but refused to
retire.
In the great engagement at Missionary Ridge, Col. Berry was
again wounded and rendered unable to walk. In that battle the
regiment lost 47 killed and wounded. It engaged in the
operations against Longstreet in East Tennessee during the
winter being about Knoxville, New Market, Strawberry plains,
and Lenoir's station.
While in East Tennessee a portion of the regiment went into
the veteran organization and were transferred to the 2nd Ky.
veteran cavalry.
The 5th participated in much of the fighting in the Atlanta
campaign, first at Rocky Face Ridge. At Resaca, it lost a
number in killed and wounded, among the killed being Capt. Ed.
Miller of Co. G. Loss was also sustained at Pumpkin Vine
creek, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain, Chattahoochee River,
Peachtree creek and other battles around Atlanta.
From Atlanta it returned to Nashville in Aug., 1864. The time
of the regiment expired in September and it was mustered out
at Louisville Sept. 14, 1864. A portion of the regiment
entered the veteran organization -- between 80 and 100 men.
These proceeded under charge of Capt. John Baker from
Louisville to Nashville and reported to Gen. Thomas for duty.
They participated in the battle of Nashville and after that
went on the pursuit of Hood's army as far as Athens, Ala.
From Athens they returned to Nashville, were then taken by way
of Louisville, Pittsburg and Philadelphia to New York, thence
by ocean transport to Hilton Head, S. C., and from there
proceeded to Raleigh, N. C., where they joined Sherman's
forces.
After the surrender they returned to Louisville, where they
were mustered out July 25, 1865.
Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 320
Stone's River after battle report:
Reports of Lieut. Col. William W. Berry, Fifth Kentucky Infantry.
HDQRS. LOUISVILLE LEGION, FIFTH REGIMENT
KENTUCKY VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, In Camp, January 8, 1863.
SIR: Having been called upon to furnish a report of the operations of
my command from December 26, 1862, to January 4, 1863, inclusive,
I have the honor to submit the following:
On the morning of December 26, 1862, being on picket duty with my
regiment, I received orders to join the column marching southward on
the Nolensville road. We reached Nolensville at 3 o'clock the next
morning.
At daylight of the 27th I was ordered forward, and marching 3 miles we
found the enemy, with some artillery, prepared to obstruct our march.
We were thrown out on the right of the road, and immediately pushed
at them, but they fell back to a new position; and this was repeated time
and again throughout the day, until we reached a point 1 mile south of
Triune. We traversed in line of battle this day some 4 or 5 miles of
country, made up of corn and cotton fields, thickets, swamps, and
woods. I sustained no loss in this skirmish.
Sunday morning, December 28, I was ordered to support Gen.
Willich in a reconnaissance. No enemy was found, and we returned to camp.
On Monday, Gen. McCook's command having moved off toward
Murfreesborough, distant some 15 miles, we were left near Triune to
prevent the enemy interrupting the march of the main column.
Here we remained till the morning of the 30th, when we marched off
toward Murfreesborough and rejoined the division, which we found
moving into position beyond Wilkinson's Cross-Roads.
In a short time orders came for us to support a cavalry reconnaissance
of the country lying to the right of our front. No enemy was found in
this direction, and we returned to the division. We were then placed in
position as a reserve for the other two brigades of Gen. Johnson's
command, occupying the extreme right of the army.
Early the next morning I received orders to form a line of battle 150
paces in rear of the First Regt. Ohio Volunteers; this done, the
command "forward" was given. In this advance, Capt. A. H. Speed, of
Company C, was struck in the abdomen by a spent ball and severely
injured; but, like a true soldier, he retained the command of his
company until late in the evening, when he was ordered to the hospital.
When the First Ohio reached a fence on the crest of a hill, it became
hotly engaged. At the same time there was rapid firing from the Sixth
Indiana, on the left, and also from some regiment on the right of the
First Ohio. A section of Simonson's battery had been moved to the
front, to the left and abreast of the First Ohio. A battery of the enemy
immediately opened upon it, and their shells killed and wounded many
of my men. Presently I observed the regiment to the right of the First
Ohio in full retreat, and in a few minutes I saw the First Ohio moving
to the rear.
I could see no enemy, on account of the intervening ridge, and
supposing that the First Ohio had exhausted their ammunition, I instantly
prepared to take its place; but just before it reached my lines, to my
utter amazement, a mass of the enemy appeared, moving obliquely upon
my right flank. A change of front was imperative. While executing this
movement, refusing my right to the enemy, the First Ohio passed
through the right of my regiment and threw into great confusion my four
right companies. Their officers promptly arrested this, and I here take
occasion to thank Capt. John Lucas, commanding Company F, First
Lieut.'s Thomas Foreman, commanding Company A, and Joseph E.
Miller, commanding Company D, and Second Lieut. A. Sidney Smith,
commanding Company I, for their steadiness at this trying moment.
In the mean time, my left getting into position, poured its fire into the
steadily advancing columns of the enemy; but the troops to my left were
giving way, and the enemy, getting a battery into position, almost
enfiladed me. The right of the division was completely crushed in, and
I had no connection, consequently no protection, here. It was soon
manifest that I must fall back or be isolated.
A new position was taken some 200 paces in rear of our first, and here
I believe we could have successfully resisted the enemy, but some
general, I do not know who, ordered the entire line to fall back still
farther, and those who like rapid movements would have been more than
satisfied with the celerity with which some of the floating fragments of
regiments obeyed him.
Pending this movement my attention was called by Col. Baldwin to
a piece of artillery abandoned by those whose business it was to look
after it. A full battery of the enemy was playing on it at the time. I
immediately yoked the Legion to it, and, with Huston and Thomasson
as the wheel-horses, it was dragged to the railroad, where the new line
was forming. I was shortly ordered to move by the flank farther up the
railroad, where a position was taken that was not assailed on this day.
I had gone into the fight with 320 muskets, a portion of my command
being on detached service; 19 men were killed, including Capt.
Ferguson, of Company I, who was one of our best officers; 80 were wounded.
Among the latter were 7 commissioned officers, viz: Lieut.
Col. W. W. Berry, shot through the wrist; Maj. John L. Treanor,
wounded by a shell in the thigh; Capt. A. H. Speed, wounded in the
abdomen; Capt. L. P. Lovett, slightly, in the thigh; First Lieut. Frank
Dissell, mortally; First Lieut. John D. Sheppard, seriously, through the
left lung, and First Lieut. William H. Powell, slightly, in the shoulder,
and 26 missing. Some of these, I am mortified to say, ran away at the
first fire. Their names shall be duly reported.
During the engagement my color-bearer was shot, and down went the
flag, but like lightning it gleamed aloft again in the hands of three men,
struggling who should have it. Their names are John B. Scheible,
Company E; Charles Fleckhammer, jr., Company H, and Sergt. John
Baker, Company D. The latter bore it throughout the remainder of the
day. Private William Shumaker, of Company G, was badly shot through
the thigh, but persisted in fighting with the regiment till he was forced
to the rear by order of his captain. I commend him for his devotion.
Sergeant-Maj. Willett deported himself most bravely, and deserves
promotion. Adjutant Johnstone rendered me every assistance in his
power, and I especially thank him.
On the morning of January 1, I received orders to move farther to the
front. There was no general advance of our lines, though constant
skirmishing through the day. Capt. Thomasson had command of the
skirmish line, and by his adroitness was mainly instrumental in the
capture of 95 prisoners. The enemy held a dense wood about 300 yards
in front of us, in the edge of which were some cabins occupied by
sharpshooters. I proposed to push forward my skirmishers and dislodge
them, provided those on my right and left were simultaneously
advanced. This, though ordered, was not done, and I did not deem it
safe to expose my flank; but toward evening the fire of these riflemen
became so annoying that I was determined, at any cost, to stop it. I
ordered Capt.'s Hurley and Lindenfelser to move with their companies
directly upon the houses and burn them. Across the open fields they
dashed, the enemy having every advantage in point of shelter. Capt.
Huston was then ordered to their support, and the place was literally
carried by assault, the houses burned, and 5 of the enemy left dead upon
the spot. This was the last we heard of the sharpshooters. The daring
displayed by officers and men in this affair deserves especial
consideration. But one man was hurt-Corporal Moneypenny, shot
through the leg.
The skirmishing in which my command took part on the days succeeding
this was of an uneventful character, and I forego the details.
Respectfully, your obedient servant,
WM. W. BERRY,
Lieut.-Col., Cmdg.
Capt. WILLIAM MANGAN,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brigade.
Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXXII.] THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN. PAGE 341-29
[Series I. Vol. 20. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 29.]
Chickamagua after battle report:
Report of Col. William W. Berry, Fifth Kentucky Infantry.
HDQRS. FIFTH KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS,
Chattanooga, September 27, 1863.
CAPT.: I have the honor to submit the following report of movements of my
command in the action of the 19th instant:
Early on the morning of the 19th we marched with the brigade from the
extreme right to the left of the army, and were then thrown forward to
retake ground rom which a portion of the army had been driven before we
arrived. The brigade was formed in two lines, my regiment being on the left
of the front line and the extreme left of the army. Skirmishers were thrown
out and the command moved forward. The skirmish line was soon engaged.
The brigade took the double-quick, charged the enemy, and drove him a
mile., retaking fully the ground lost in the morning. Her we were halted in
the edge of a field, my command forming, with the First Ohio, and obtuse
angle, with the opening toward the front. The enemy were soon seen
working round toward our left. Notified Col. Baldwin of this, when he
ordered the Ninety-third Ohio to deploy on my left. It had scarcely gotten
into position before the attack opened on us, with infantry and artillery. Col.
Strong, of the Ninety-third, was wounded at almost the first fire and his
regiment slightly recoiled, thus leaving my flank exposed; but the left
companies poured in an oblique fire, and in a moment the Ninety-third came
dashing forward under Col. Baldwin, kept it up, charged and drove the
enemy in their front, and captured two guns. The enemy had already been
repulsed in my front, and this was
the last we heard of them for an hour and a half, when they again advanced,
attacked, and were driven back in more confusion than before. Capt. Hurley
and Lieut. Ayars had command of the skirmish line up to this time, and
merit the highest commendation for their skill and courage. The enemy
repulsed, I ordered the command to cease firing, and for a few moments the
utmost quiet reigned, when just at disk an officer called my attention to the
right, where the First Ohio had been, and there stood a rebel line of battle
pouring its fire into the second line of the brigade. A slight ridge had cut the
line of vision between me and the First Ohio, which regiment I could not see
without going on the top of this ridge. It seems that the troops on their right
had given way, thus letting the enemy in on their flank, and they had fallen
back to the second line. I had no notice of this till I saw the direction of the.
It was so dark, that except by this direction of the fire, you could not tell
friend from foe. I was completely cut off. I ordered the regiment to move
off silently. The enemy thought us a part of their line and did not fire into
us, but a Federal brigade (Starkweather's, I believe) coming up just then,
poured a volley in my ranks and killed many of my men. We not stopping
they ran away, fortunately for us. Upon reaching the second line I faced the
regiment about and opened instantly on the enemy, who, thinking their own
line was firing on them, soon retreated, leaving us in full possession of the
ground. In this half-hour's work I lost 100 men and 7 officers killed and
wounded. Maj. Thomasson, Capt. Lovett, and Capt. Lucas have been since
missing; but it is to be hoped that they are only wounded and prisoners, as
there are no better officers in this army. Here the brigade staff rode up, and
informing me that Col. Baldwin could not be found, reported to me for
orders, and I took command of the brigade. For a further report of the part
taken by the brave men of the Fifth Kentucky, I respectfully refer you to the
report of Capt. Huston, simply adding that harder fighting was never done
and truer officers and men were never known.
Respectfully, your obedient servant.
WM. W. BERRY,
Col. Fifth Kentucky Volunteers.
Capt. FRANK P. STRADER,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brigade.
-----------

Report of Capt. John M. Huston, Fifth Kentucky Infantry.
HDQRS. FIFTH KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS.
September 27, 1863,
SIR: I make, by order, the following report of the operations of the Fifth
Regt. Kentucky Volunteers in the battle of the 20th instant:
Upon colonel Baldwin's disappearance, Col. Berry assumed command of the
brigade, and I took command of the regiment, Lieut.-Col. Treanor being
on detached duty, and Maj. Thomasson shot. The regiment at this time was
standing in line of battle, having just repulsed the enemy in a night fight.
Presently I was ordered to move my command to the rear to get connection
with the general line of the army. Reaching this point, the brigade was
formed in two lines, the Fifth Kentucky was on the right of the second line.
At 9 o'clock on the morning of the 20th the enemy attacked, but was
repulsed all along the line. At 10 o'clock, as I was moving my command
forward to strengthen the front line, the left of the division on our left was
seen to give way. Col. Berry halted me, and ordered a change of front
forward on the left company, which was promptly executed, thus throwing
my line perpendicular to the front. The troops on the immediate left of the
brigade stood fast, but those on the extreme left fled in the utmost confusion,
the enemy pursuing till he was in our original rear. Another change of front
was ordered and executed, and being commanded to charge the enemy in
his flank, I did so, fell upon him, and drove him a mile and a half. I suppose
in this charge we captured 200 prisoners, among them Brig.-Gen. Adams,
besides inflicting heavy loss upon the enemy in killed and wounded. Here
Capt. Moninger was wounded, and my oldest son, Lieut. Huston, was
killed. He died like a soldier, with sword in hand, in the midst of a
victorious charge upon a fleeing enemy. I was ordered back to the brigade,
and joined it immediately, where I lay in the second line till evening, when
I was ordered to fall back with the brigade to Rossville, which we did in the
utmost order regularity.
The officers and men conducted themselves in a manner to reflect great
credit upon themselves and their country, the only difficulty being to restrain
them from going too far. Lieut. Zoller, though wounded, kept his place
with his company and behaved most manfully. Capt.'s Hurley, Lindenfelser,
and Wilson, and Lieut.'s McCorkhill, Miller, Powell, Thomas, and Jones
are gallant soldiers. The conduct of Adjutant Johnstone was conspicuous for
courage, and I thank him for the assistance given myself. I am under great
obligations to Dr. Barr, of the First Ohio, detailed to take charge of my
wounded, which duty was discharged fearlessly and energetically. The men
of the Fifth Kentucky are soldiers; this is not only proven by their bravery
on the field, but by the patience and forbearance with which they endured
the most extraordinary labor, exposure and privation. John T. Steele, of
company B, especially deserves mention. Struck four times, he still stuck to
his gun, and was with the Ninety-third Ohio when the cannon was captured,
he himself reaching the pieces first and capturing the battery battle flag.
Corpl. William Murphy, of Company I, when the color-bearer was shot,
seized the flag and thenceforth bore it.
Respectfully, your obedient servant.
JOHN M. HUSTON,
Capt.
Capt. FRANK P. STRADER,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brigade.
Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLII.] THE CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN. PAGE 568-50
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 50.]
 
RUSSELL, Absolom Jr (I118973160)
 
34 Beckham Deaton

DEATON, Beckham age 100, of Bellbrook passed away peacefully at Sycamore Hospital Tuesday, February 22, 2005. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife Sallie in 1999. He is survived by his two sons and daughters-in-law Homer and Cece Deaton of Saline, MI, and Walter and Ginger Deaton of Bellbrook; two grandchildren Dell Deaton and Beth and husband Chris Bartley, all of Michigan; three great-grandchildren Hannah and Ben Bartley, Ross Deaton, and special caregivers Rose Shine and Carmen Thompson. Beckham had retired from Frigidaire division of General Motors after more than 29 years of service and had previously taught school in the Kentucky school system for more than 16 years Funeral services will be 1 PM Saturday, February 26, 2005 at the Tobias Funeral Home, Far Hills Chapel, 5471 Far Hills Ave. Interment Miami Valley Memory Gardens. The family will receive friends from 6 PM to 8 PM Friday, February 25th at the funeral home.

Published in Dayton Daily News on Feb. 24, 2005 
DEATON, Beckham (I1929)
 
35 Biological daughter of James Gleason, lived with Lucia F Gleason. She was referred to as "Gini" Family: CESAN, Harry W / GLEASON, Virginia Irene (F00434)
 
36 Birth: 11 or 12 Oct 1904 REINERT, Fredrick William (I1689)
 
37 Bobbie Jean Roberts, age 85, was born on a farm in Breathitt County, Kentucky to Tyman and Samuel Smith. When she was a young girl, her father died in a railroad accident and her mother moved the family to Northern Kentucky. In 1949, she married Donald Roberts, who became long-time Florence Fire Chief, and they had a long happy marriage of 55 years. She lived over 60 years on New Uri Avenue, surrounded by wonderful neighbors who were life-long friends. Bobbie especially enjoyed her church work at Grace Episcopal, camping at state parks with friends, and spending time with her granddaughter, Logan. Two years ago, she moved to Colonial Gardens, where she received loving care and made many new friends.

She was preceded in death by her son Scott, her husband Donald, her sister Juanita, and her brother Paul. She is survived by her son Randall Roberts (Barbara Wade), her granddaughter Logan Roberts, and her sister Nellie Ward.

Service
Thursday, January 15, 2015
10:00 AM
Grace Episcopal Church 
SMITH, Bobby Jean (I539034556)
 
38 Body donated to medical science, Specifically: The Ohio State University Medical Center HODGE, Clarence Marion (I539035997)
 
39 burial near Petersburg, Virginia DUGGER, William Julius (I535417073)
 
40 burial: Barker Ridge, Wet Virginia RUSSELL, Charles Edmond (I535428655)
 
41 burial: Brown Mission Cemetary, Clay County, Kentucky ROBINSON, William M. (I535423310)
 
42 buried George Clemons Cem., Quicksand Creek, Breathitt Co. Ky
MARRied Andrew Ritchie, march 23, 1860 in Perry Co, Kentucky 
MILLER, Mahala "Hainey" (I539035469)
 
43 buried: Julius Duggar Cemetery, Fish Springs, Johnson County, Tennessee ENGLE, Mary (I535258843)
 
44 buried: Ritchie Cem., Lewis Fork, Buckhorn, Breathitt Co, Ky RITCHIE, James Monroe (I118985595)
 
45 Called Forestdale Cemetery. They do not have plot information for Jones Sherwin Davis. Death record lists Calvary as the cemetery. There are 2 Calvary Cemetary's in Holyoke. Calvary - Gates of Heaven (Catholic Cemetery) and Calvary Cemetery  DAVIS, Jones Sherwin (I2512)
 
46 Chester L. Young, 86, of East Hartford, beloved husband of 66 years, to Beth (Bird) Young, died Wednesday (September 26, 2001). Chester is also survived by daughter, Lorraine Law of Gloucester, MA; son Kenneth Young of Dunnellon, FL; a sister, Doris Dubiel of Marlborough; a brother, Robert Young of Florida; and three grandchildren, Eric Law of Florida, Chris Law of Gloucester, MA, and Darrell Young of East Hartford; several nieces and nephews. Private graveside services will be held in Silver Lane Cemetery, East Hartford. No calling hours. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy in Chester's memory may be made to a charity of the donor's choice. The Young family has entrusted Newkirk & Whitney Funeral Home, East Hartford, to care for final arrangements. Published in The Hartford Courant on Sept. 29, 2001. YOUNG, Chester Louis (I2175)
 
47 CHICOPEE, May 1, 1958: Alphonse Bousquet, 84, Holyoke resident for 16 years, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Armand E. Page of Leslie St, Willimansett, this morning after a short illness. A native of St. Pie, Canada, he came to this country in 1916 and lived in Three Rivers until 1925, when he moved to Holyoke with his wife, the late Mrs. Amelia (Graveline) Bousquet. After 16 years in this city, he moved to South Hadley Falls, and later to Springfield, where he lived until January. Until his retirement 10 years ago, he was employed as a carpenter in this city. He is survived by five daughters, Mrs. Rose Ouimett of Springfield, Mrs. Valida Page, and Mrs. Bella Pauquette of Willimansett, Mrs. Marie Genest of Ludlow and Mrs. Maria D'Amour of Canada; three sons, Noe of Chicopee Falls, Eddie of Springfield, and Rene of Three Rivers; 25 grandchildren; two brothers, Nobert and John, and one sister, Mrs. Eva Dubreuil, all of Canada. The funeral will be held from the Messier funeral home Monday morning at 8:15 with solemn high mass of requiem at 9 in the Nativity Church with burial in Notre Dame Cemetery in South Hadley. [Springfield Union (MA) on Friday, May 2, 1958] BOUSQUET, Alphonse Jr. (I2599)
 
48 Clan/Family Histories
- Russel/Russell

Russell Tartan This name is probably derived from "rous" meaning red and early bearers of the name no doubt had red hair - and were probably of Norman or French extraction. While the name is by no means confined to Scotland, it is within thp 50 most frequently found names in the country.

The name is one of the earliest surnames recorded in Scotland, the first being a Walter Russell who witnessed a charter in Paisley Abbey some time between 1164 and 1177. John, son of Robert Russel of Duncanlaw granted land to found a Hospitatween 1180 and 1220. Robert Russel of Berwickshire was a big enough landowner to be required to sign the Ragman Roll and pay homage to Edward I in 1296.

Russels can be found in Aberdeenshire where Rozel, an English baron who had fought at the siege of Berwick and the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333, obtained an estate at Aden. The family was described as "Russel of that Ilk" implying that there substantial landowners. As such, Russel is one of the clans and families of Scotland with a coat of arms recognised by the Lord Lyon.

Not all Russells were recorded for their good works. Jerome Russell, a monk, was burned at the stake in the High Street, Glasgow, for heresy in 1539.

There was a significant family of Russels in Selkirkshire in the Scottish Borders and many entered military service in India in the 18th and 19th centuries.

In England, a family which began with a Rufus (another form of Russell), rose to become the Dukes of Bedford. The 3rd son of the 6th Duke of Bedford studied at Edinburgh University where he was greatly influenced by the independent and democc philosophy taught there. He became a great Reformer and was an architect of extending the franchise for the Westminster parliament in the first Reform Act of 1832. His grandson, the 3rd Earl Russell, was also an independent thinker, better known as the philosopher Bertrand Russell.

Russell was the 47th most frequent surname at the General Register Office in 1995. 
RUSSELL, Absolom (I118973164)
 
49 Cleta Oaks Potter
POTTER, Cleta 80, of Middletown, died Saturday, August 1, 2009, at her residence. She was born in Breathitt County, KY, on August 19, 1928 to parents Clayton and America (Lynch) Oaks. Cleta was a devoted mother and grandmother who loved life and her family. She was a caregiver who provided companionship to the elderly. Ms. Potter is survived by Louis Potter, Sr., a son, Louis (Sandy) Potter, Jr.; daughters, Tina (Daniel) Smith, Deborah (Quentin) Combs and Pam (Michael) Halsey; brothers, Earl, Harry and Finley Oaks; sisters, Maude Russell, Audrey Howard and Linda Young; seven grandchildren, Amanda Bailey, Evan Combs, Sara Wilson, Rebecca Hunt, Reece Potter, Bethany Potter and Addy Potter and seven great grandchildren. Cleta was preceded in death by her parents, a grandson, Bryan Smith and two sisters, Dixie Howard and Helen Couch. Funeral Service will be held Wednesday, August 5, 2009 at 10:00 AM at WILSON-SCHRAMM-SPAULDING FUNERAL HOME, 3805 Roosevelt Blvd., Middletown with Pastor Sandy Apgar officiating. Visitation will be held Tuesday, August 4, 2009 from 5:00 - 8:00 pm at the funeral home. Interment will be at Pleasant Hill Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to Hospice Care Of Middletown, 1131 Manchester Ave., Middletown, OH 45042 or /Greater Cincinnati Chapter, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203 Please sign the guest book online at WilsonSchrammSpaulding.com 
OAKS, Cleta (I539034655)
 
50 Corporal
Company D
10th Wisconsin Infantry
Union Army
CIVIL WAR

He enlisted at Portage, WI, on 26 Sep 1861. He died of typhoid fever at General Hospital No. 8 at Nashville, TN. He was first buried “in the vicinity of Nashville”, then later was disinterred and reinterred at the National Cemetery.

Various documents show his date of death as 7 Mar, 16 Mar, and 17 Mar. The best source of information is the casualty list from 1862, which shows that he died on 17 Mar 1862. 
CROUCH, Samuel (I539037550)
 

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